Tag Archives: programming

When I was a kid, I used to take things apart to see if I could figure out how they worked.  I realize I’m probably like every other engineer in that regard, but I was also one of those who failed to put things back together many times.  I suspect I may have been more successful with time, but my parents put the kabosh on that particular behavior pretty quickly.  Thus, I was doomed from the get-go as an experimentalist. I learned to program when I was 9, and it turned out I was actually pretty good at it. Ironically, I never considered a career involving programming until college.  I had wanted to go into physics after having a great time in high school physics classes.  I love figuring things out, and that’s what physics was: non-stop problems that you had to figure out. It wasn’t until I enrolled in…

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This post is by Mike Barr, a guest author at Engineer Blogs and a regular contributor to Netrino.com and Embedded Gurus I don’t really know why I studied Electrical Engineering in college.  I’m not even sure why I chose engineering generally–except that my father and his father had both been (mechanical) engineers. Unlike the majority of engineers I’ve met in my career, the only thing I’d done prior to college that resembled engineering was a bit of BASIC programming on an Apple ][e. I am not a tinkerer by nature. So it should not be too surprising that I reconsidered my choice of EE major about halfway through college. I had been working in a student computer lab and taking some elective Computer Science courses and thus contemplated a switch to CS. But I didn’t want to add semesters to my academic career or the bill, so ultimately decided to…

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A Computer Science Professor from Harvard who had recently gotten tenure was working a sabbatical at Google when he decided to stay on full time at Google and leave his academic position. He writes a somewhat tongue in cheek comparison of his day over at his blog. What’s this have to do with plumbers? I’m getting there. And Mario is a plumber for those of you not up on your video game history. Computer Scientist David Lemire responds with a post about why you might not like your job but people envy it in his post citing famous cases like the guy with the PhD in Philosophy who left his job to go start his own shop. Lemire seems to think the disparity is in the day-to-day coding as compared to big picture meetings, mentoring and grant writing at Harvard. However, I think this misses the mark. The former Harvard…

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