Tag Archives: cross-disciplinary engineering

What if every person’s perception of time was arbitrary and completely different? What if what seemed like months to you felt like days to someone else? I’m not talking about psychology here, I’m talking about this week’s theme: deadlines. The academics here at Engineer Blogs already weighed in with things that are familiar to their world; Miss Outlier talked about long term deadlines, GEARS talked about procrastination, and Cherish talked about the difficulty of getting started. Paul Clarke gives some tips about dealing with deadlines and whether to approach them as the tortoise or as the hare. Unlike academics most of my deadlines are much more short term. Sometimes you get two days to pull off a major design and drawing change and sometimes you get two hours to put together part of a report an executive is going to see. My issues with due dates are often that different…

Read more

Sometimes a good project is like a good kitchen. You have the chef in charge and you have everyone else working at their specialty to make an amazing meal. This week’s topic here at Engineer Blogs has been interdisciplinary experiences: which I think is incredibly appropriate given our writers already form an interdisciplinary team. Cherish talked about getting a foundation (see what I did there?) in mechanical engineering from her geology background. GEARS ranted on controls engineers(we’re all agreed they are the step-cousins of the engineering family, right?). Paul proved not all sparkies are hopeless at manufacturing and production with his jack of all trades background. I’ve spoken on my own blog how I got off to an early start in engineering with electromechanical devices and cabling. I think of it sort of as an ugly inbetween in the worlds of electrical and mechanical engineering. As I spoke about on my blog,…

Read more

This week’s theme on Engineer Blogs is about interacting with engineers from other discplines.  Given I work at a university with people from many different engineering disciplines, I have a bit to say on this topic.  Specifically, talking to engineers in other fields often means I need a translation dictionary – maybe one that translates between electromagnetics and device engineering.  Very often, not understanding the constraints that other engineers deal with can leave me, and them, feeling very frustrated.                       I’ve been fortunate, however, that I managed to get something similar that works between mechanical and electrical engineers – via a geology class, of all things. The mechanical engineers I work with often look at the thermal and mechanical properties of electronics packaging in order to figure out issues surrounding failure and reliability.  At first, some of their gibberish technical…

Read more

3/3