January 2012

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(Foreign) Grad School Admissions

(Foreign) Grad School Admissions

I know that I have been a total slacker on posting lately and for that, I apologize. While that’s a relatively minor thing to apologize for (especially to all two of my readers…), there is something that we, meaning academic-type people, should apologize for: our terrible graduate admissions policies. Obviously, I’m painting with a very large brush here but I can totally picture this exact thing happening to [new] faculty members at 100’s of places around the country this time of year. Let me paint a better picture for you. When you’re reviewing graduate student admission applications, you’re handed a stack of folders with a bunch of stuff in them with clear instructions like “Here, rate these applicants for MSc and PhD admissions”. The typical things in the folder are: transcripts, GRE, TOEFL, resume/CV, personal statement, and letters of recommendation. From that, you have to sort between the haves and […]

One year down!

One year down!

EngineerBlogs.org is officially one year old! Our first post was January 13th, 2011. Crazy! It feels like it’s a lot more, but I guess that’s what happens after posting once per week (a quick look at my other sites and you see why 1x per week seems like a lot to me). First and foremost, I’d like to personally thank all of our readers. Your wonderful feedback has encouraged us to keep writing and producing what we hope continues to be good content. The field of engineering is not a field littered with authors, so I’m glad we managed to cobble together some great minds and pens (and at a wonderful price!). We will continue to try and come up with interesting and relevant topics throughout the next year, as well as add new voices to the conversation. So let’s look back at this year. What did this year look […]

Weekend Journal — The Trickle Down Techonomy

Weekend Journal — The Trickle Down Techonomy

You know the term “trickle down economy“, right? It’s a term attributed to supply side economics, both positively and negatively. Basically, it’s the idea that if you have top performers and give them beneficial tax treatment, the effects will ripple throughout the economy. I don’t care about the politics behind it, I care about the idea (and will, in fact, delete any and all political comments in the comments section). That the top performers (or in the case of the economy, earners) should in theory pass any benefit they receive to those less fortunate is what I’m focusing on. However, I have seen a similar effect, though abstracted, in the technology industry. Instead of earnings, imagine knowledge to be the currency. In place of “taxes”, the top tier workers will pay in “knowledge” to the world, which then should filter down to the masses. Everyone still with me? My basic […]